Does Your Vitamin or Herbal Supplement Contain What It Claims?

By Lori Newman, Special to Lifescript
Published February 12, 2015
Nutritional supplement users were shocked by a recent report saying that some herbal products may not contain the active ingredients. Here’s how to tell if a supplement is safe and effective…

Do you take ginkgo biloba to improve your memory? Echinacea to boost your immune system? St. John’s wort for a better mood?

You may not be getting what you pay for, according to New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman.

On Feb. 3, his office accused four major retailers – Walmart, Walgreens, Target and GNC – of selling fraudulent store-brand supplements. DNA testing found that nearly 4 out of 5 bottles contained little or none of the plants listed on the label, it claimed.
Schneiderman said he sent letters to these retailers warning them to stop selling the products. He also asked for detailed information about how the supplement capsules were produced, processed and tested, and to explain what quality control measures were in place during their manufacture.

Walmart’s Spring Valley brand fared the worst during testing: just 4% of the bottles tested contained any DNA from the advertised plant, according to the release.

The 6 products tested from each retailer were ginkgo biloba, St. John’s wort, ginseng, garlic, echinacea and saw palmetto.

What did the tests reveal?
Only 21% of the products tested actually contained any DNA from the plant species advertised on the label, Schneiderman reported. And 35% of the products contained DNA from plant species not listed on the labels – which Schneiderman called “fillers and contaminants.”

“A large number of the tests did not reveal any DNA from a botanical substance of any kind,” Schneiderman stated.

In the four store brands analyzed, unlisted ingredients found in various capsules included carrots, wheat, rice, allium (onions or garlic), beans, asparagus and leaves from house plants.

“This study undertaken by Attorney General Schneiderman’s office is a well-controlled, scientifically based documentation of the outrageous degree of adulteration in the herbal supplement industry,” says Arthur Grollman, M.D., professor of pharmacological sciences at Stony Brook University, in the press release.

A Consumer Controversy
Representatives of the supplement industry and some consumer groups disagreed with the report’s findings, saying that the kind of testing done on the products was an ineffective way of analyzing processed herbs. The tests, conducted by an expert from Clarkson University in Potsdam, N.Y., used “DNA barcoding” techniques, in which genetic markers are examined to identify plant species.

“DNA testing seldom is able to properly identify chemically complex herbal extracts, because often DNA doesn’t get through the extraction process,” Mark Blumenthal, director of the American Botanical Council in Austin, Tex., told the Associated Press.

“All GNC products are submitted to rigorous and generally accepted testing before they reach our customers,” said that company’s CEO, Michael Archbold, in a statement.

“When industry-wide standards are used to authenticate the ingredients in our products, the results demonstrate they are pure, safe and fully compliant,” Archbold said.

Controversies over supplement quality are magnified by the fact that they aren’t regulated like products labeled as drugs. Manufacturers are “prohibited from marketing products that are adulterated or misbranded,” but aren’t required to get Food and Drug Administration approval before producing or selling them, the FDA says.

“Supplements do not undergo the [FDA’s] rigorous evaluation process which scrutinizes everything about the drug — from the design of clinical trials to the severity of side effects to the conditions under which the drug is manufactured,” Schneiderman said in his Feb. 2 press release.

They do, however, have to “make sure that all claims and information on the product label and in other labeling are truthful and not misleading,” the FDA states.

The federal agency also requires that all ingredients not listed on a product’s “Supplement Facts” panel must be listed in “other ingredients” beneath that panel.

Herbal products not listing every ingredient on their labels “can cause serious harm to consumers unaware of the actual ingredients in the pills and capsules they ingest,” because they could cause allergic reactions or interact poorly with medications, Dr. Grollman says.

Be Smart About Supplements U.S. consumers spend nearly $20 billion per year on dietary supplements, according to the Natural Products Foundation. But with so many different brands on the market, it can be difficult to know which ones to buy.

What should you do? First, check with your doctor before taking any supplement, notes nutrition expert Robert Wildman, Ph.D. Some may not be recommended for certain health conditions or can interact poorly with medications.

Then, purchase brands you trust. If you aren’t sure, there are organizations that can help.

    • ConsumerLab.com tests vitamins, minerals, herbs and other products for active ingredients and potentially harmful contaminants. Results are made available to paid subscribers for $3 per month.
    • U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) is a nonprofit organization that tests some supplements; those that meet its standards can display the USP seal of approval on their labels.
    • Other seals of approval include the Natural Products Association’s GMP certification, which means the manufacturer has met standards of good manufacturing practices. NSF certificationensures that products don’t contain unacceptable levels of contaminants.
  • The FDA’s website provides an in-depth Q&A section about dietary supplements. Topics include how they’re regulated, what kinds of claims manufacturers can make about a product, and how consumers can inform themselves about supplements’ safety.

This Easy Exercise as Good For Heart as Heavy Aerobics

This Easy Exercise as Good For Heart as Heavy Aerobics

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by: Scott Davis

So let’s say you’re like majority of people who doesn’t get enough exercise to keep good cardiovascular health. And your doctor has gone the traditional route, and ordered “…40 minutes a day of a brisk walk or biking or swimming- something vigorous and aerobic…”

It is true that those forms of workout are good for your health. But did you know that there are easier, less painful and (thank goodness) less expensive exercises that reap the same (or better) results?

A new study out of Harvard University reveals how a specific, easy type of exercise (everyone can do) lowers blood pressure, improves cholesterol and boost overall cardiovascular health as much as vigorous aerobics- even if only done twice a week.

There actually is a way to check the box your doctor wants you to check for exercise, and not pull a hammy or break a hip in the process- try yoga. Especially yoga for beginners.

Research, published in European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, reviewed more than 35 clinical trials and found that people who practice any form of yoga (from the easiest beginner moves to the most challenging levels) benefitted from doing the exercises as much as doing strenuous aerobic exercises.

Even if they only did the yoga twice a week!

 

The Internet, especially Youtube, is awash with easy to follow (and free) tutorials that can get you started with an introduction of what yoga is all about. Although for best (and safest) results, it is better to start with a certified trainer who can help you with your moves and create a plan that you can safely do.

Most people who do yoga regularly experience a drop in high blood pressure, increased flexibility, better balance, and sleeping better. And what’s likely the most important benefit of all- their emotional stress levels are improved greatly, eliminating one move at a time, the chronic nature of high blood pressure.

It’s not just for ‘hippies’ or ‘tree-huggers,’ either. Even if the idea sounds a little weird or ‘out there,’ you’re doing yourself a dis-service if you don’t at least give a beginner’s class a try. You may find the gentle moves and easy pace to be the most fun you’ve had in a long while.

Improvement Following Chiropractic Care in a Pediatric Patient Suffering from Priapism

 

little boys photo: My 2 handsome little boys johnzac.jpg

 

Robert Sinnott, DC & Peter J. Jenema, DC

Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health – Chiropractic ~ Volume 2015 ~ Issue 1 ~ Pages 42-45

Abstract

Objective: This case study describes the chiropractic care of a 3 year old male child with painful priapism who experienced improvement following specific chiropractic adjustment of vertebral subluxation.

Clinical Features:  The patient’s mother brought him in to receive chiropractic care in hopes of improving his physical condition. Treatment through the child’s pediatrician included the use of ice and antihistamine, with the next step being surgical options.  At the time chiropractic treatment began, the patient had been experiencing near constant, painful erections for a three and a half week period.

Interventions and Outcomes: The chiropractic care consisted of Gonstead methodology of analysis and adjustment aimed at reducing vertebral subluxation. Adjustments were made using a high velocity, low amplitude, specific thrust at C1 and S2.   The mother reported a significant decrease in episodes following treatment with frequency of erections decreasing steadily as care progressed.

Conclusions: Priapism is a rare condition in the pediatric population but it can affect a patient both physically and emotionally.  There are no examples of chiropractic helping this type of condition in the literature and more research needs to be performed in order for any evidence of a beneficial relationship to be established.

Key words: Priapism, Chiropractic, Gonstead, Subluxation, Pediatric

CDC website-Possible Side-effects from Vaccines

Any vaccine can cause side effects. For the most part these are minor (for example, a sore arm or low-grade fever) and go away within a few days. Listed below are vaccines licensed in the United States and side effects that have been associated with each of them. This information is copied directly from CDC’s Vaccine Information Statements, which in turn are derived from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for each vaccine.

Remember, vaccines are continually monitored for safety, and like any medication, vaccines can cause side effects. However, a decision not to immunize a child also involves risk and could put the child and others who come into contact with him or her at risk of contracting a potentially deadly disease.

Adenovirus vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from Adenovirus vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

Mild Problems

Several mild problems have been reported within 2 weeks of getting the vaccine:

  • headaches, upper respiratory tract infection (about 1 person in 3)
  • stuffy nose, sore throat, joint pain (about 1 person in 6)
  • abdominal pain, cough, nausea (about 1 person in 7)
  • diarrhea (about 1 person in 10)
  • fever (about 1 person in 100)

Severe Problems

More serious problems have been reported by about 1 person in 100, within 6 months of vaccination. These problems included:

    • blood in the urine or stool
    • pneumonia
    • inflammation of the stomach or intestines
    • It is not clear whether these mild or serious problems were caused by the vaccine or occurred after vaccination by chance.

      As with all vaccines, adenovirus vaccine will continue to be monitored for unexpected or severe problems.

      Note: Adenovirus vaccine is approved for use only among military personnel.

      This information was taken directly from the Adenovirus VIS
      (This information taken from Adenovirus VIS dated 7/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Anthrax vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from anthrax vaccine?

      Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction.

      Anthrax is a very serious disease, and the risk of serious harm from the vaccine is extremely small.

      Mild Problems

      • Reactions on the arm where the shot was given:
        • Tenderness (about 1 person out of 2)
        • Redness (about 1 out of 7 men and 1 out of 3 women)
        • Itching (about 1 out of 50 men and 1 out of 20 women)
        • Lump (about 1 out of 60 men and 1 out of 16 women)
        • Bruise (about 1 out of 25 men and 1 out of 22 women)
      • Muscle aches or temporary limitation of arm movement (about 1 out of 14 men and 1 out of 10 women)
      • Headaches (about 1 out of 25 men and 1 out of 12 women)
      • Fatigue (about 1 out of 15 men, about 1 out of 8 women)

      Severe Problems

      • Serious allergic reaction (very rare – less than once in 100,000 doses).

      As with any vaccine, other severe problems have been reported. But these don’t appear to occur any more often among anthrax vaccine recipients than among unvaccinated people.

      There is no evidence that anthrax vaccine causes long-term health problems.

      Independent civilian committees have not found anthrax vaccination to be a factor in unexplained illnesses among Gulf War veterans.

      This information was taken directly from the Anthrax VIS
      (This information taken from Anthrax VIS dated 3/10/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • DTaP vaccine side-effects
      (Diphtheria, Tetanus, and acellular Pertussis)

      What are the risks from DTaP vaccine?

      Getting diphtheria, tetanus or pertussis disease is much riskier than getting DTaP vaccine.

      However, a vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of DTaP vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Mild Problems (Common)

      • Fever (up to about 1 child in 4)
      • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 child in 4)
      • Soreness or tenderness where the shot was given (up to about 1 child in 4)

      These problems occur more often after the 4th and 5th doses of the DTaP series than after earlier doses.

      Sometimes the 4th or 5th dose of DTaP vaccine is followed by swelling of the entire arm or leg in which the shot was given, for 1 to 7 days (up to about 1 child in 30).

      Other mild problems include:

      • Fussiness (up to about 1 child in 3)
      • Tiredness or poor appetite (up to about 1 child in 10)
      • Vomiting (up to about 1 child in 50)

      These problems generally occur 1 to 3 days after the shot.

      Moderate Problems (Uncommon)

      • Seizure (jerking or staring) (about 1 child out of 14,000)
      • Non-stop crying, for 3 hours or more (up to about 1 child out of 1,000)
      • High fever, 105 degrees Fahrenheit or higher (about 1 child out of 16,000)

      Severe Problems (Very Rare)
      Serious allergic reaction (less than 1 out of a million doses) Several other severe problems have been reported after DTaP vaccine. These include:

      • Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness
      • Permanent brain damage.

      These are so rare it is hard to tell if they are caused by the vaccine.

      Controlling fever is especially important for children who have had seizures, for any reason. It is also important if another family member has had seizures.

      You can reduce fever and pain by giving your child an aspirin-free pain reliever when the shot is given, and for the next 24 hours, following the package instructions.

      This information was taken directly from the DTaP VIS
      (This information taken from DTaP VIS dated 5/17/07. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Hepatitis A vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from hepatitis A vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of hepatitis A vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Getting hepatitis A vaccine is much safer than getting the disease.

      Mild Problems

      • soreness where the shot was given (about 1 out of 2 adults, and up to 1 out of 6 children)
      • headache (about 1 out of 6 adults and 1 out of 25 children)
      • loss of appetite (about 1 out of 12 children)
      • tiredness (about 1 out of 14 adults)

      If these problems occur, they usually last 1 or 2 days

      Severe Problems

      • serious allergic reaction, within a few minutes to a few hours after the shot (very rare).

      This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis A VIS
      (This information taken from Hepatitis A VIS dated 10/25/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Hepatitis B vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from hepatitis B vaccine?

      Hepatitis B is a very safe vaccine. Most people do not have any problems with it.

      The vaccine contains non-infectious material, and cannot cause hepatitis B infection.

      Some mild problems have been reported

      • Soreness where the shot was given (up to about 1 person 4)
      • Temperature of 99.9°F or higher (up to about 1
        person in 15).

      Severe problems are extremely rare. Severe allergic reactions are believed to occur about once in 1.1 million doses.

      A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. More than 100 million people in the United States have been vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine.

      This information was taken directly from the Hepatitis B VIS
      (This information taken from Hepatitis B VIS dated 2/2/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Hib vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) vaccine?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare.

      Most people who get Hib vaccine do not have any problems with it.

      Mild Problems following Hib vaccine:

      • redness, warmth, or swelling where the shot was given
      • fever

      These problems are uncommon. If they occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 2 or 3 days.

      Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

      • Brief fainting spells can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
      • Severe shoulder pain and reduced range of motion in the arm where a shot was given can happen, very rarely, after a vaccination.
      • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      This information was taken directly from the Hib VIS
      (This information taken from Hib VIS dated 02/04/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • HPV–Cervarix vaccine side-effects
      (Human Papillomavirus Cervarix vaccine)

      What are the risks from HPV–Cervarix vaccine?

      The HPV Cervarix® vaccine has been in use around the world for several years and has been very safe.

      However, any medicine could possibly cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious injury, or death, is extremely small.

      Life-threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it would be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      Several mild to moderate problems are known to occur with this HPV vaccine. These do not last long and go away on their own.

      • Reactions where the shot was given
        • Pain (about 9 people in 10)
        • Redness or swelling (about 1 person in 2)
      • Other mild reactions
        • Fever of 99.5 or higher degrees Fahrenheit (about 1 person in 8)
        • Headache or fatigue (about 1 person in 2)
        • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain (about 1 person in 4)
        • Muscle or joint pain (up to 1 person in 2)
      • Fainting
        Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

      Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual or severe problems.

      This information was taken directly from the HPV-Cervarix VIS
      (This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/3/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • HPV–Gardasil vaccine side-effects
      (Human Papillomavirus Gardasil vaccine)

      What are the risks from HPV–Gardasil vaccine?

      The HPV-Gardasil® vaccine has been used in the U.S. and around the world for about six years and has been very safe.

      However, any medicine could possibly cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of any vaccine causing a serious injury, or death, is extremely small.

      Life-threatening allergic reactions from vaccines are very rare. If they do occur, it would be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      Several mild to moderate problems are known to occur with this HPV vaccine. These do not last long and go away on their own.

      • Reactions in the arm where the shot was given:
        • Pain (about 8 people in 10)
        • Redness or swelling (about 1 person in 4)
      • Fever:
        • Mild (100° F) (about 1 person in 10)
        • Moderate (102° F) (about 1 person in 65)
      • Other problems
        • Headache (about 1 person in 3)
        • Fainting. Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking movements) can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after a vaccination can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by falls. Tell your doctor if the
          patient feels dizzy or light-headed, or has vision changes or ringing in the ears.

      Like all vaccines, HPV vaccines will continue to be monitored for unusual or severe problems.

      This information was taken directly from the HPV-Gardasil VIS
      (This information taken from HPV VIS dated 5/17/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Influenza (inactivated) vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from inactivated influenza vaccine?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

      • Brief fainting spells can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
      • Severe shoulder pain and reduced range of motion in the arm where a shot was given can happen, very rarely, after a vaccination.
      • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      Mild problems following inactivated flu vaccine:

      • soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given
      • hoarseness
      • sore, red or itchy eyes
      • cough
      • fever
      • aches
      • headache
      • itching
      • fatigue

      If these problems occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1 or 2 days.

      Moderate problems following inactivated flu vaccine:

      • Young children who get inactivated flu vaccine and pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) at the same time may be at increased risk for seizures caused by fever. Ask your doctor for more information. Tell your doctor if a child who is getting flu vaccine has ever had a seizure.

      Inactivated flu vaccine does not contain live flu virus, so you cannot get the flu from this vaccine.

      As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.

      The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit: Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Vaccine Safety Activities.

      One brand of inactivated flu vaccine, called Afluria, should not be given to children 8 years of age or younger, except in special circumstances. A related vaccine was associated with fevers and fever-related seizures in young children in Australia. Your doctor can give you more information.

      This information was taken directly from the Inactivated Influenza VIS
      (This information taken from Inactivated Influenza VIS dated 8/19/2014. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Influenza (live) vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from LAIV?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

      • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      Mild problems that have been reported following LAIV:

      Children and adolescents 2-17 years of age:

      • runny nose, nasal congestion or cough
      • fever
      • headache and muscle aches
      • wheezing
      • abdominal pain or occasional vomiting or diarrhea

      Adults 18-49 years of age:

      • runny nose or nasal congestion
      • sore throat
      • cough, chills, tiredness/weakness
      • headache

      LAIV is made from weakened virus and does not cause flu.

      As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.

      The safety of vaccines is always being monitored. For more information, visit: Vaccine Safety Monitoring and Vaccine Safety Activities.

      This information was taken directly from the LAIV VIS
      (This information taken from Live Influenza VIS dated 8/19/2014. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • JE-IXIARO vaccine side-effects
      (Japanese Encephalitis – IXIARO)

      What are the risks from Japanese encephalitis vaccine?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. When side effects happen, they are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Mild Problems

      • Pain, tenderness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 4).
      • Fever (mainly in children).
      • Headache, muscle aches (mainly in adults).

      Moderate or Severe Problems

      Studies have shown that severe reactions to JE vaccine are very rare.

      Problems that can happen after any vaccine

      • Brief fainting spells can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
      • Lasting shoulder pain and reduced range of motion in the arm where the shot was given can happen, very rarely, after a vaccination.
      • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      This information was taken directly from the JE-Ixiaro VIS
      (This information taken from Japanese Encephalitis Ixiaro VIS dated 1/24/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • MMR vaccine side-effects
      (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

      What are the risks from MMR vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions.

      The risk of MMR vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Getting MMR vaccine is much safer than getting measles, mumps or rubella.

      Most people who get MMR vaccine do not have any serious problems with it.

      Mild Problems

      • Fever (up to 1 person out of 6)
      • Mild rash (about 1 person out of 20)
      • Swelling of glands in the cheeks or neck (about 1 person out of 75)

      If these problems occur, it is usually within 7-12 days after the shot. They occur less often after the second dose.

      Moderate Problems

      • Seizure (jerking or staring) caused by fever (about 1 out of 3,000 doses)
      • Temporary pain and stiffness in the joints, mostly in teenage or adult women (up to 1 out of 4)
      • Temporary low platelet count, which can cause a bleeding disorder (about 1 out of 30,000 doses)

      Severe Problems (Very Rare)

      • Serious allergic reaction (less than 1 out of a million doses)
      • Several other severe problems have been reported after a child gets MMR vaccine, including:
        • Deafness
        • Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness
        • Permanent brain damage

        These are so rare that it is hard to tell whether they are caused by the vaccine.

      This information was taken directly from the MMR VIS
      (This information taken from MMR VIS dated 4/20/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • MMRV vaccine side-effects
      (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella)

      What are the risks from MMRV vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of MMRV vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Getting MMRV vaccine is much safer than getting measles, mumps, rubella, or chickenpox.

      Most children who get MMRV vaccine do not have any problems with it.

      Mild Problems

      • Fever (about 1 child out of 5).
      • Mild rash (about 1 child out of 20).
      • Swelling of glands in the cheeks or neck (rare).

      If these problems happen, it is usually within 5-12 days after the first dose. They happen less often after the second dose.

      Moderate Problems

      • Seizure caused by fever (about 1 child in 1,250 who get MMRV), usually 5-12 days after the first dose. They happen less often when MMR and varicella vaccines are given at the same visit as separate shots (about 1 child in 2,500 who get these two vaccines), and rarely after a 2nd dose of MMRV.
      • Temporary low platelet count, which can cause a bleeding disorder (about 1 child out of 40,000).

      Severe Problems (Very Rare)
      Several severe problems have been reported following MMR vaccine, and might also happen after MMRV. These include severe allergic reactions (fewer than 4 per million), and problems such as:

      • Deafness.
      • Long-term seizures, coma, lowered consciousness.
      • Permanent brain damage.

      Because these problems occur so rarely, we can’t be sure whether they are caused by the vaccine or not.

      This information was taken directly from the MMRV VIS
      (This information taken from MMRV VIS dated 5/21/10. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Meningococcal vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from meningococcal vaccines?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of the meningococcal vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Brief fainting spells and related symptoms (such as jerking or seizure-like movements) can follow a vaccination. They happen most often with adolescents, and they can result in falls and injuries.

      Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes after getting the shot – especially if you feel faint – can help prevent these injuries.

      Mild Problems

      As many as half the people who get meningococcal vaccines have mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot was given.

      If these problems occur, they usually last for 1 or 2 days. They are more common after MCV4 than after MPSV4.

      A small percentage of people who receive the vaccine develop a fever.

      Severe Problems

      Serious allergic reactions, within a few minutes to a few hours of the shot, are very rare.

      This information was taken directly from the Meningococcal VIS
      (This information taken from Meningococcal VIS dated 10/14/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      PCV13 vaccine side-effects
      (Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine)

      What are the risks from PCV13?

      With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own, but serious reactions are also possible.

      Reported problems associated with PCV13 vary by dose and age, but generally:

      • About half of children became drowsy after the shot, had a temporary loss of appetite, or had redness or tenderness where the shot was given.
      • About 1 out of 3 had swelling where the shot was given.
      • About 1 out of 3 had a mild fever, and about 1 in 20 had a higher fever (over 102.2°F).
      • Up to about 8 out of 10 became fussy or irritable.

      Adults receiving the vaccine have reported redness, pain, and swelling where the shot was given. Mild fever, fatigue, headache, chills, or muscle pain have also been reported.

      Life-threatening allergic reactions from any vaccine are very rare.

      This information was taken directly from the PCV VIS
      (This information taken from PCV VIS dated 2/27/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • PPSV23 vaccine side-effects
      (Pneumococcal Polysaccharide)

      What are the risks from PPSV?

      About half of people who get PPSV have mild side effects, such as redness or pain where the shot is given.

      Less than 1 percent develop a fever, muscle aches, or more severe local reactions.

      A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      This information was taken directly from the PPSV VIS
      (This information taken from PPSV VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Polio vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from IPV?

      Some people who get Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV) get a sore spot where the shot was given. The vaccine used today has never been known to cause any serious problems, and most people don’t have any problems at all with it.

      However, a vaccine, like any medicine, could cause serious problems, such as a severe allergic reaction or even death. The risk of a polio vaccine causing serious harm is extremely small.

      This information was taken directly from the IPV VIS
      (This information taken from IPV VIS dated 11/08/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Rabies vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from rabies vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from rabies vaccine are very rare.

      Mild Problems

      • soreness, redness, swelling, or itching where the shot was given (30% – 74%)
      • headache, nausea, abdominal pain, muscle aches, dizziness (5% – 40%)

      Moderate Problems

      • hives, pain in the joints, fever (about 6% of booster doses)

      Other nervous system disorders, such as Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS), have been reported after rabies vaccine, but this happens so rarely that it is not known whether they are related to the vaccine.

      NOTE: Several brands of rabies vaccine are available in the United States, and reactions may vary between brands. Your provider can give you more information about a particular brand.

      This information was taken directly from the Rabies VIS
      (This information taken from Rabies VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Rotavirus vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from rotavirus vaccine?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare.

      Most babies who get rotavirus vaccine do not have any problems with it. But some problems have been associated with rotavirus vaccine:

      Mild problems

      Babies might become irritable, or have mild, temporary diarrhea or vomiting after getting a dose of rotavirus vaccine.

      Serious problems

      Intussusception is a type of bowel blockage that is treated in a hospital, and could require surgery. It happens “naturally” in some babies every year in the United States, and usually there is no known reason for it.

      There is also a small risk of intussusception from rotavirus vaccination, usually within a week after the 1st or 2nd vaccine dose. This additional risk is estimated to range from about 1 in 20,000 US infants to 1 in 100,000 US infants who get rotavirus vaccine. Your doctor can give you more information.

      This information was taken directly from the Rotavirus VIS
      (This information taken from Rotavirus VIS dated 8/26/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Shingles (Herpes Zoster) vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from shingles vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, could possibly cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. However, the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      No serious problems have been identified with shingles vaccine.

      Mild Problems

      • Redness, soreness, swelling, or itching at the site of the injection (about 1 person in 3).
      • Headache (about 1 person in 70).

      Like all vaccines, shingles vaccine is being closely monitored for unusual or severe problems.

      This information was taken directly from the Shingles VIS
      (This information taken from Shingles VIS dated 10/6/09. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Smallpox (Vaccinia) vaccine side-effects

      This medication guide replaces the Smallpox VIS. It is to be used before one receives the vaccination. Medical Guide for vaccination with ACAM2000 Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon [8 pages] (10/1/09)

    • Td vaccine (Adult Tetanus & Diphtheria)

      What are the risks from Td vaccine?

      With a vaccine, like any medicine, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Serious side effects are also possible, but are very rare.

      Most people who get Td vaccine do not have any problems with it.

      Mild Problems following Td
      (Did not interfere with activities)

      • Pain where the shot was given (about 8 people in 10)
      • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 3)
      • Mild fever (about 1 person in 15)
      • Headache or Tiredness (uncommon)

      Moderate Problems following Td
      (Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

      • Fever over 102°F (rare)

      Severe Problems following Td
      (Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

      • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and/or redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

      Problems that could happen after any vaccine:

      • Brief fainting spells can happen after any medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting, and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.
      • Severe shoulder pain and reduced range of motion in the arm where a shot was given can happen, very rarely, after a vaccination.
      • Severe allergic reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at less than 1 in a million doses. If one were to occur, it would usually be within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.

      This information was taken directly from the Td VIS
      (This information taken from Td VIS dated 2/4/14. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Tdap vaccine (Combined Tetanus, Diphtheria & Pertussis)

      What are the risks from Tdap vaccine?

      With any medicine, including vaccines, there is a chance of side effects. These are usually mild and go away on their own.

      Brief fainting spells can follow a vaccination, leading to injuries from falling. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent these. Tell your doctor if you feel dizzy or light-headed, or have vision changes or ringing in the ears.

      Mild problems following Tdap
      (Did not interfere with activities)

      • Pain where the shot was given (about 3 in 4 adolescents or 2 in 3 adults)
      • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 person in 5)
      • Mild fever of at least 100.4°F (up to about 1 in 25 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
      • Headache (about 3 or 4 people in 10)
      • Tiredness (about 1 person in 3 or 4)
      • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 in 4 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
      • Chills, body aches, sore joints, rash, swollen glands (uncommon)

      Mild problems following Tdap
      (Interfered with activities, but did not require medical attention)

      • Pain where the shot was given (about 1 in 5 adolescents or 1 in 100 adults)
      • Redness or swelling where the shot was given (up to about 1 in 16 adolescents or 1 in 25 adults)
      • Fever over 102°F (about 1 in 100 adolescents or 1 in 250 adults)
      • Headache (about 3 in 20 adolescents or 1 in 10 adults)
      • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ache (up to 1 or 3 people in 100)
      • Swelling of the entire arm where the shot was given (up to about 3 in 100).

      Severe problems following Tdap
      (Unable to perform usual activities; required medical attention)

      • Swelling, severe pain, bleeding and redness in the arm where the shot was given (rare).

      A severe allergic reaction could occur after any vaccine (estimated to occur less than once in a million doses).

      This information was taken directly from the Tdap VIS
      (This information taken from Td-Tdap VIS dated 5/9/13. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

    • Typhoid vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?

      Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of typhoid vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from either typhoid vaccine are very rare.

      Inactivated Typhoid Vaccine (Shot)

        Mild Reactions

      • Fever (up to about 1 person per 100).
      • Headache (up to about 1 person in 30).
      • Redness or swelling at the site of the injection (up to about 1 person in 15).
      Live Typhoid Vaccine (Oral)

        Mild Reactions

      • Fever or headache (up to about 1 person in 20).
      • Stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, rash (rare).

      This information was taken directly from the Typhoid VIS
      (This information taken from Typhoid VIS dated 5/29/12. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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      Varicella (Chickenpox) vaccine side-effects

      What are the risks from chickenpox vaccine?

      A vaccine, like any medicine, is capable of causing serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. The risk of chickenpox vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small.

      Getting chickenpox vaccine is much safer than getting chickenpox disease. Most people who get chickenpox vaccine do not have any problems with it. Reactions are usually more likely after the first dose than after the second.

      Mild Problems

      • Soreness or swelling where the shot was given (about 1 out of 5 children and up to 1 out of 3 adolescents and adults)
      • Fever (1 person out of 10, or less)
      • Mild rash, up to a month after vaccination (1 person out of 25). It is possible for these people to infect other members of their household, but this is extremely rare.

      Note: The first dose of MMRV vaccine has been associated with rash and higher rates of fever than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Rash has been reported in about 1 person in 20 and fever in about 1 person in 5. Seizures caused by a fever are also reported more often after MMRV. These usually occur 5-12 days after the first dose.

      Moderate Problems

      • Seizure (jerking or staring) caused by fever (very rare).

      Severe Problems

      • Pneumonia (very rare)

Other serious problems, including severe brain reactions and low blood count, have been reported after chickenpox vaccination. These happen so rarely experts cannot tell whether they are caused by the vaccine or not. If they are, it is extremely rare.

This information was taken directly from the Varicella VIS
(This information taken from Varicella VIS dated 3/13/08. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

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Yellow Fever vaccine side-effects

What are the risks from Yellow Fever vaccine?

A vaccine, like any medicine, could cause a serious reaction. But the risk of a vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely low.

Mild Problems

Yellow fever vaccine has been associated with fever, and with aches, soreness, redness or swelling where the shot was given.

These problems occur in up to 1 person out of 4. They usually begin soon after the shot, and can last up to a week.

Severe Problems

      • Severe allergic reaction to a vaccine component (about 1 person in 55,000).
      • Severe nervous system reaction (about 1 person in 125,000).
      • Life-threatening severe illness with organ failure (about 1 person in 250,000). More than half the people who suffer this side effect die.

        These last two problems have never been reported after a booster dose.

This information was taken directly from the Yellow Fever VIS
(This information taken from Yellow Fever VIS dated 3/30/11. If the actual VIS is more recent than this date, the information on this page needs to be updated.)

What if there is a moderate or severe reaction?

  • What should I look for?
    • Any unusual condition, such as a high fever or unusual behavior. Signs of a serious allergic reaction can include difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness.

    What should I do?

    • Call a doctor, or get the person to a doctor right away.
    • Tell your doctor what happened, the date and time it happened, and when the vaccination was given.
    • Ask your doctor, nurse, or health department to report the reaction by filing a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) form. Or you can file this report through the VAERS web site at http://www.vaers.hhs.govExternal Web Site Icon, or by calling
      1-800-822-7967.
    • VAERS does not provide medical advice.

American Medical Association opposes mandatory vaccines: medical ethics statement

Toxic vaccine ingredients and their adverse effects:

 

by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor

(NaturalNews) According to the “Informed Consent” section of the AMA Code of Medical Ethics posted at the American Medical Association website, the AMA is fundamentally and unambiguously opposed to mandatory vaccine programs in America. Read the AMA’s Code of Medical Ethics statement here.

A mandatory vaccination policy — forced vaccination of unwilling recipients — is, by definition, a medical intervention carried out without the consent of the patient or the patient’s parents. This directly violates the very clear language in the Informed Consent section of the AMA Code of Medical Ethics which states:

The patient should make his or her own determination about treatment… Informed consent is a basic policy in both ethics and law that physicians must honor, unless the patient is unconscious or otherwise incapable of consenting and harm from failure to treat is imminent.

“Physicians must honor” informed consent


The AMA’s Code of Medical Ethics statement is very clear: “physicians must honor” the policy of informed consent. In fact, the AMA describes this as “a basic policy in both ethics and law” and only makes exception if the patient “is unconscious” or if harm from failure to treat “is imminent.”

Mandatory vaccine interventions are conducted in total violation of this code of ethics. Most unvaccinated children are in a state of perfect health, with no symptoms and no active disease. There is no “imminent” risk of harm from “failure to treat.”

Because the mainstream media is desperately trying to confuse the public about the very definition of “medical consent,” here is the Dictionary.com definition of “consent”:

verb – to permit, approve, or agree; comply or yield (often followed by to or an infinitive)
He consented to the proposal. We asked her permission, and she consented.

Patients deserve an “informed choice”

The AMA’s Code of Ethics statement furthermore says that patients possess a “right of self-decision” and that this right can only be effectively exercised “if the patient possesses enough information to enable an informed choice.”

Nearly all vaccinations are carried out in direct violation of this medical code of ethics because patients are almost never handed vaccine insert sheets, and the very real risks of vaccination are almost never explained to anyone. In fact, virtually the entire medical establishment operates in a state of total denial that any vaccine risks exist at all. This, too, is a striking violation of the AMA’s code of ethics.

It is also an outright abandonment of all logic and medical reality, as every medical intervention comes with some level of risk, even if that risk is small. It is not zero, as is routinely and repeatedly claimed by vaccine fanatics.

Doctors should “respectfully” explain treatment options to patients

The AMA’s Code of Ethics further states “Physicians should sensitively and respectfully disclose all relevant medical information to patients.”

Instead, what we actually see in America today is:

• Belligerent doctors verbally berating patients for asking intelligent, informed questions about vaccine ingredients and vaccine side effects.

• Arrogant doctors threatening to cut off all medical treatment from patients unless they agree to a coerced medical intervention (vaccinations).

• Doctors and hospitals calling law enforcement authorities on families, then staging the state seizure of children while threatening parents with arrest and imprisonment (medical kidnapping).

These actions are so far removed from the AMA’s Code of Ethics that they call into question the very real question of whether the entire medical system has utterly abandoned any shred of medical ethics at all.

A campaign of intellectual bigotry carried out in the name of science

Today, medical obedience to mandatory vaccines is being aggressively demanded by rage-filled doctors, health authorities and media outlets. A vicious campaign of intellectual bigotry has been unleashed against all vaccine skeptics, with malicious tactics such as equating skeptical thinkers who seek to avoid mercury with people who still think the Earth is flat.

There is no question that such malicious tactics against concerned moms are being conducted in total violation of the AMA’s own Code of Ethics, which also states that “The physician’s obligation is to present the medical facts accurately to the patient or to the individual responsible for the patient’s care and to make recommendations for management in accordance with good medical practice.”

This code of medical ethics means doctors may educate patients and even respectfully urge them to follow a particular course of action, but they may not coerce, threaten, intimidate or otherwise verbally berate patients who disagree with their suggested course of action.

Here’s the full statement from the AMA’s Code of Ethics page, section 8.08 – Informed Consent:

The patient’s right of self-decision can be effectively exercised only if the patient possesses enough information to enable an informed choice. The patient should make his or her own determination about treatment. The physician’s obligation is to present the medical facts accurately to the patient or to the individual responsible for the patient’s care and to make recommendations for management in accordance with good medical practice. The physician has an ethical obligation to help the patient make choices from among the therapeutic alternatives consistent with good medical practice. Informed consent is a basic policy in both ethics and law that physicians must honor, unless the patient is unconscious or otherwise incapable of consenting and harm from failure to treat is imminent. In special circumstances, it may be appropriate to postpone disclosure of information, (see Opinion E-8.122, “Withholding Information from Patients”).

Physicians should sensitively and respectfully disclose all relevant medical information to patients. The quantity and specificity of this information should be tailored to meet the preferences and needs of individual patients. Physicians need not communicate all information at one time, but should assess the amount of information that patients are capable of receiving at a given time and present the remainder when appropriate. (I, II, V, VIII)

Because we believe the AMA will, after seeing this investigative story, attempt to alter or revoke this medical ethics document, we are also posting a screen shot of the AMA’s page sourced on February 9, 2015:

Entire mainstream media now urging total abandonment of the AMA’s own Code of Ethics

What else is fascinating about this finding is the realization that the entire mainstream media is almost fanatically screaming for the wholesale abandonment of the very principles of medical ethics endorsed by the AMA in its own words.

Almost everywhere in the media, the public is now being berated and screamed at in the name of “SCIENCE!” while vaccine skeptics are being derided as “kooks” and “nut jobs” because they have questions about vaccines that the vaccine industry refuses to answer. Those reasonable, rational questions include inquiries concerning the toxic effects of vaccine ingredients, the history of faked vaccine research, the CDC scientist’s confession of a vaccine cover-up at the CDC, the admission that many current vaccines are backed by no clinical trials, and even questions about why the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program has already paid out billions of dollars in proven vaccine damages at the same time the medical system claims vaccines have never harmed anyone and don’t cause dangerous side effects.

All of this activity carried out in witch hunt fashion by the mainstream media and vaccine fanatics posing as “scientists” is conducted in gross violation of the AMA’s own Code of Ethics, which calls for doctors to respectfully inform patients of their choices, then allow the patient to make their own informed choice.

Six questions for the AMA

Here are six important questions for the AMA:

#1) Will you now denounce the vaccine fanatics who are calling for vaccines to be forced onto people without their consent?

#2) If not, will you revoke the AMA’s Code of Ethics and abandon what have already called a fundamental “patient right” to be informed and make their own decision about medical interventions?

#3) Will you publicly condemn doctors who are using tactics of coercion, verbal abuse, intimidation and threats against patients who have reasonable questions about vaccine safety? If not, will you publicly endorse their tactics and encourage them to be used even more frequently?

#4) If, as you state on the AMA website, “Informed consent is a basic policy in both ethics and law that physicians must honor,” then will you insist that your own AMA members follow this policy? Or is it acceptable that they almost universally violate this policy as part of a “vaccine lynch mob” mentality that has now swept across the minds of the medical profession?

#5) If the AMA does not immediately denounce the widespread vaccine violations of its own Code of Ethics, then what medical ethics does the AMA actually stand for, if any? Are there any limits to the coercion tactics doctors may use against patients to force them into medical treatments demanded by doctors?

#6) If the AMA abandons its own code of medical ethics, then how can patients trust doctors who are AMA members to act with any sense of ethics at all?

Sources for this story include:
[1] http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-re…

Utilization of Videofluoroscopy to Demonstrate Kinematic Changes to the Spine Following Chiropractic Care

 

Fitzwilliam Health Clinic

Casey N. D’Arcy, DC & Nathan Berner, DC

Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research ~ February 2, 2015 ~ Pages 9-13

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate changes in intersegmental motion of the spine following chiropractic care with the utilization of video fluoroscopic studies.

Clinical Features: Four subjects were included in this study.  All patients presented to the chiropractic clinic seeking care for relief of symptoms.  The protocol used consisted of a combination of video fluoroscopy, plain film x-ray photographs, and infrared thermography scans.  Each of the four patients’ videofluoroscopy tapes were evaluated in order to identify the existence and location of vertebral locking within the spine.  Based upon the patient’s clinical presentation they were adjusted as indicated and underwent follow up videofluoroscopy analysis following chiropractic care.

Outcomes: All four subjects in the study had a significant degree of positive and measurable change with intersegmental motion following chiropractic intervention.  Three females and one male participated and each had immediate and positive reports on relief of symptoms.   Images were taken from the videos in maximal extension before and after chiropractic adjustment(s) were delivered to the segment(s) determined to have vertebral subluxation present.  On average, there were two adjustments to the segment(s) showing vertebral locking on the video fluoroscopy motion study and all demonstrated decreased vertebral locking on the post motion study.

 

Conclusion: With the utilization of video fluoroscopy the chiropractic profession is able to reliably demonstrate kinematic changes of the spine following chiropractic care.

 

Keywords: Subluxation, Pierce Results System, Chiropractic, Videofluoroscopy

Beware of these 6 common household items that cause cancer

cancer

(NaturalNews) Most people probably live under the assumption that their place of dwelling is a safe haven from all the dangers that lurk “out there.” But little do they know that many common household products contain deadly chemicals that are known to cause cancer, reproductive harm, birth defects and other health damage. Here’s six of the most popular categories to avoid for the safety of you and your family:

1) Air fresheners. They’re a staple in many American households, but conventional air fresheners are a hotbed of poisonous substances that could leave you and your loved ones infertile, brain-damaged or chronically ill. Tests conducted by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) found that most air fresheners contain phthalates, which among other things interfere with male hormone production.

Most air fresheners are also loaded with other cancer-causing volatile organic compounds as well, which interfere with reproduction, respiration and cellular regeneration. A 2008 study conducted by Anne Steinemann at the University of Washington found that all air fresheners tested emitted chemicals known to be carcinogenic, meaning they cause cancer.
Instead of toxic commercial air fresheners, stick with all-natural essential oils, which can be applied to the skin or released into the air from a diffuser.

2) Candles. Similar to commercial air fresheners, many scented candles are also toxic. A study pioneered by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) found that nearly half of all scented candles on the market contain lead wiring in their wicks, which is released into the air upon burning. This lead might make the wicks more stable, but it also leads to hormone disruption, behavioral disorders and various other health problems.

Many candles are also made of paraffin wax which, when burned, generates two highly toxic compounds, benzene and toluene, both of which are carcinogenic. Artificial fragrances and dyes are also present in many scented candles, which when burned end up in your lungs.

3) Art supplies. Cultural enrichment and creativity are both positive aspirations in life, but not when they involve many conventional art supplies. Many of the epoxy materials, glues, acrylic paints and solvents, drawing utensils and other supplies used to create art contain chemicals linked to allergies, organ damage and cancer.

The federal Labeling Hazardous Art Materials Act (LHAMA) requires that all art supplies sold in the U.S. bear warnings if they cause any acute hazards. But manufacturers are not required to provide an ingredients list, which is why it is recommended that users of such supplies purchase only products that are certified by the Art and Creative Materials Institute (ACMI).

ACMI-certified products undergo rigorous evaluations by independent toxicologists to make sure that they are safe for everyone, including small children.

4) Shampoos and conditioners. Toxins in cosmetics is a huge issue today, with many conventional consumer products — including some labeled as “natural” or “organic” — containing ingredients like sodium lauryl sulfate that generate cancer-causing byproducts when used. Other carcinogenic additives commonly used in hair care products include polyethylene glycol (PEG) and cocamide DEA.

Safe Cosmetics has put together a list of the safest and most eco-friendly shampoos on the market, which are free of most or all of the chemicals listed in its “Skin Deep” database, which you can access here:
SafeCosmetics.org.

5) Antiperspirant deodorants. Millions of people use them daily to cover up foul body odor and reduce armpit perspiration. But antiperspirant deodorants are a no-go if you want to avoid chemicals like aluminum chlorohydrate, which can absorb directly into the skin and promote the formation of breast cancer. Aluminum from antiperspirants is also believed to contribute to brain diseases like Alzheimer’s.

Other toxic additives in antiperspirant deodorants include parabens, a class of artificial preservatives that mimics estrogen in the body and promotes the growth of cancer cells. Parabens are also linked to gastrointestinal damage, nausea and central nervous system depression.

6) Shower curtains. They might help prevent water from spraying all over the floor, but your average plastic shower curtain acts something like a radiator for toxic chemical release. Many shower curtains, it turns out, off-gas harmful chemicals known as volatile organic compounds, or VOCs, that are known to damage the respiratory tract, central nervous system, liver and kidneys.

If your shower curtain has that unique “new shower curtain smell,” it is likely releasing deadly chemicals — potentially upwards of 108 different VOCs, in fact — that are harming you and your children. For this reason, it is important to stick with only non-toxic, PVC-free shower curtains made without these harmful chemicals.

Some of the best options include shower curtains made from hemp, linen, birch, organic cotton or PEVA, which you can learn more about here:
RonAndLisa.com.